Batsford Prize for Illustration 2017 (Nature)

Ideas    |    Choice   |    Processes   |    Practitioners   |    Documentation   |    Evaluation

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Browsing for ideas

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Batsford Prize
How to enter
2016 winners



 

Choice

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 NATURE

Nature & Us
Humans Nature Right Relationship[
BBC
Marxist Perspective
Environment
Icebreaker
National Geographic
2/3’s of the world animals will be lost by 2020

It’s not pollution that’s the problem.
It’s not waste that’s the problem.
It’s not climate change that’s the problem.
It’s not global warming that’s the problem.
It’s not polar ice caps melting that’s the problem.
It’s not deforestation that’s the problem.
These are symptoms of a bigger issue.
It’s the way we think, the way we live today.
If your sick, you go to a doctor. If there’s a problem you find a solution.
We only have one planet.
We all live on the same one.
We all have a common interest. This is our home and we are burning it down.
 



 

Processes

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Lino
Foil
Lasercut / Papercut
Watercolour & Outlines

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Practitioners

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Svabhu Kohli

Eloise Renouf

Alfred Basha

Clare Curtis

Eiko Ojala

Marcel George

 



 

Documentation of working process

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Images
 


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YCN – Quorn

Ideas | Choice | Processes | Practitioners | Documentation | Evaluation

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Browsing for ideas

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Brief choices

Quorn brief

Deliverables Guidelines

quorn_logo

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ycn_quorn


Quorn
A GREAT TASTING RANGE
Quorn is perfect if you’re trying to eat healthier as part of an active lifestyle, watching your weight, or if you want some meat-free meal inspiration.

Plus products like Quorn Mince are a great source of protein that still allow you to enjoy all your favourite meals.

WHAT ARE
QUORN PRODUCTS?
Quorn products are made from Mycoprotein™. Mycoprotein™ is a nutritionally healthy protein source that is meat free and naturally low in saturated fat and high in fibre.

Quorn products have the taste, appearance and texture of meat, perfect if you want meat free meals or are thinking of creating healthier versions of your favourite everyday meals.

HOW IS
QUORN MADE?
Quorn’s main ingredient is
Mycoprotein
™, a nutritionally healthy protein source.
Mycoprotein
™ is produced by a process of fermentation similar to that used for yeast in bread. Unlike other meat alternatives, there’s no strong aftertaste, and Quorn is great at absorbing the flavours used in cooking, making for great tasting meals.

Can I be intolerant to Quorn?
View our intolerance information page.

Quorn sustainability

BETTER FOR YOU
& THE PLANET
Quorn products are made from Mycoprotein™. Mycoprotein™ is a nutritionally Healthy Protein that is Meat Free and naturally low in saturated fat and high in protein and fibre. Quorn products have the taste appearance and texture of meat, perfect for if you’re thinking about eating less meat or creating healthier versions of your favourite everyday meals.

Recommended by
doctors,
nutritionists
and heart
foundations
all over
the world

A NOTE FROM
OUR CEO
At Quorn we have a simple mission, ‘to help consumers eat less meat’. Given the ethical, health and environmental benefits of Quorn foods, this places corporate responsibility at the heart of everything we do.

Kevin

From farm to fork
we’re dedicated to
outstanding
environmental
performance

Quorn is the first global meat-alternative brand to achieve third party certification of it’s carbon footprint figures. See Carbon Trust for more information.
The Carbon Trust’s mission is to accelerate the move to a sustainable, low carbon economy. We are independent experts on carbon reduction and resource efficiency, who reinvest surpluses from group commercial activities into our mission.

Healthy Meal Ideas
Comfort Food Classics
Recipe Range

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Choice

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D&AD refine brief
create a campaign

Meat Free
Save environment be veggie
Why be veggie?

Persuade others to go vegan

10 reasons to convince people to go meat free today
5 reasons to go meat-free now

  • packed with antioxidants, healthy fats and way more vitamins and minerals
  • slimming
  • not as expensive as buying meat
  • increases longevity
  • Scorching summer temps in June and months-long droughts out west prove that global warming is real. Give the Earth a hug by going meat-free today. It takes 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water to create a single pound of beef, versus 39 gallons of water to produce a pound of vegetables
  • can reduce the risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and more

    You will be bettering your health, have a more optimistic credit card statement and help the planet

  • Transition smoothly, from four legs to two legs to no legs.

    BEST WEBSITE – why go meat free?
    WHY GO MEAT FREE FOR A DAY?

    Welcome to Meat Free Monday New Zealand! Cutting out meat, once a week has taken the world by storm and now Aotearoa is on board with a mission to excite and inspire ALL Kiwis – meat lovers, pie munchers and tree huggers alike – to discover the magnificent world of vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts and seeds.

    We Kiwis love our meat, and in moderation it’s a great source of protein and nutrients. The downside is that our appetite for meat and dairy – millions of pounds a year from millions of animals – takes a toll on our digestive and cardiovascular health, our land, oceans and climate, animal welfare and our wallets!

    With so many tasty Meat Free options, eating clean and green has never been more delicious. Whether you take the Meat Free Monday pledge for the environment, for your wallet, or for your health, you have the power to change the world, simply by changing what’s on your plate.

    So take the plunge, take the pledge: for your health, for your wallet, and for our planet!

    FOR YOUR HEALTH
    And what about your health? The average New Zealander on a Western diet typically consumes double the protein our bodies actually need. Meat in moderation is a great source of protein, iron, zinc, niacin and key vitamins, but the scientific evidence is increasingly clear that over indulging in meat – partucularly red and processed meat – increases our risk of chronic preventable conditions which have reached epic proportions, like heart disease, stroke, cancer, liver and kidney disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Vegetarian meals are naturally low in saturated fat, high in fibre, and full of vitamins, minerals, and cancer-fighting compounds. Meat, dairy products and eggs, on the other hand, are low in fibre and high in saturated fat and cholesterol, which can make us overweight and lead to clogged arteries and heart attacks. Here’s what we have to look forward by reducing our nation’s meat intake:

    Reduce Heart Disease – Beans, peas, nuts and seeds contain little to no saturated fats. Reducing saturated fats can help keep your cholesterol low, and cut risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent data from a Harvard University study found that replacing saturated fat-rich foods (for example, meat and full fat dairy) with foods that are rich in polyunsaturated fat (for example, vegetable oils, nuts and seeds) reduces the risk of heart disease by 19%.

    Limit Cancer Risk – In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund report recommended limiting the consumption of red meats such as beef, pork and lamb because of a ‘convincing’ link with colorectal cancer. We Kiwis top the charts as having the highest rate of this preventable cancer in the world. Hundreds of other studies suggest that diets high in fruits and vegetables can reduce cancer risk.

    Fight Diabetes – Research suggests that plant-based diets – particularly those low in processed meat – can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Eat cleaner – chickens, cows, and pigs aren’t always fed what they’re designed to eat. In many cases they are fed what’s cheap and what makes them grow incredibly fast, including grains, hormones and rendered animals.

    Curb Obesity – People on low-meat or vegetarian diets have significantly lower body weights and body mass indices. A plant-based diet is a great source of fibre (absent in animal products). This makes you feel full with fewer calories, i.e. lower calorie intake and less overeating.

    Live Longer – Red and processed meat consumption is associated with increases in total mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality.

    Improve Your Diet – Consuming protein rich vegetables like peas, beans and lentils results in higher intakes of fibre, protein, folate, zinc, iron and magnesium with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat.

    Just what the doctor ordered!

    FOR YOUR WALLET
    You might be surprised to learn that vegetarian food is not only good for your health and the environment; it’s also easy on your wallet! Food prices are continuing to rise, especially in packaged items and meat, which require extra expenses like feed and transportation. Forgoing meat once a week is a great way to cut the weekly budget. In fact, many staple vegetarian foods cost very little and can be found in the grocery store – not just in specialty markets. Whole grains like quinoa, barley and brown rice, legumes like chickpeas and soybeans, and other beans like black-eyed peas and black beans are protein packed and very inexpensive – certainly cheaper than processed and packaged foods! Bought in bulk, whole grains and beans can cost just pennies per meal. And because they are full of fibre they make you feel full and satisfied (put them into soups, stews, salads, burritos, etc.) without the side effect of heaps of saturated fat from animal protein. One block of tofu will provide a hearty meal for two, at half the price of two cuts of meat. Fresh and seasonal vegetables and fruits can be found at supermarkets and farmers’ markets for very reasonable prices.

    But that’s not all. Giving meat a rest once a week will also help to curb both your personal and our national healthcare expenses in the long run. If you think these don’t affect you so much, think again. At the individual level, being sick is expensive. Moreover, a huge part of our country’s annual budget is committed to health-care costs, paid for by your tax dollars. There are also indirect healthcare costs due to lost productivity.

    Here are some smart shopping tips to help you save on your food bills:

    Buy in season. Produce in season is usually less expensive than out-of-season produce because it’s more abundant.
    Where possible avoid pre-cut, washed, and packaged fruits and vegetables. They’re more expensive (and use more packaging) than whole foods
    Farmers’ markets are a great place to find fresh, in-season, and locally grown produce for cheap — especially if you shop at the end of the market day, when growers may be willing to sell their produce at a discount!
    Frozen veggies, particularly the store brands, are a steal! They are often cheaper than fresh ones, and can actually be more nutritious because the veggies are frozen right after they’re picked, preserving their nutrients. Keep an eye out for sales and stock up your freezer with veggies that can be tossed into soups, stews, stir-fries, pasta, and many other dishes.
    Grow your own! Turn your backyard, patio or kitchen windowsill into valuable real estate and enjoy home grown fruits and vegetables all year long. You’ll get fresh, organic food for a fraction of the price. Seedlings are fantastic, but growing from the seed is mega cheap!

    FOR OUR PLANET
    Cutting out meat, once a week is not only healthy for your body and your bank account; it’s great for the planet too! The livestock industry is one of the largest contributors to global environmental degradation. Producing all that meat and dairy requires large amounts of pesticides, chemical fertiliser, feed, fuel and water. It also generates 50% of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions and deposits a huge amount of toxic manure and wastewater into our groundwater, rivers, streams and, ultimately, the ocean. By taking the Meat Free Monday pledge you’re becoming an environmental champion, reducing your ecological footprint and lightening the load you place on nature.

    Reduce your carbon footprint – Livestock animals produce large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, greenhouse gases far more concentrated than CO2. In 2006, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) concluded that worldwide livestock farming generates 18percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions — compared with 13percent generated by all transportation combined. In 2009, however, WorldWatch Institute reported that the more accurate figure may be as high as 51percent. In New Zealand agriculture is responsible for 50percent of our climate change emissions profile. Annual worldwide demand for meat continues to grow. Cutting out meat, once a week can help slow this trend.

    Protect our fresh water supplies – The water needs of livestock are huge. An estimated 7000 to 9500 litres of water goes into producing only 500 grams of beef! It takes only a fraction of the water used for meat production to make an equivalent amount of plant protein. In addition, the excrement of millions of animals is leaching into our streams, contaminating our water systems and asphyxiating aquatic life and vegetation. Furthermore, pesticides, antibiotics and hormones find their way into our drinking water.

    Reduce fossil fuel dependence. On average, about 40 calories of fossil fuel energy go into every calorie of feed lot beef in the U.S. Compare this to the 2.2 calories of fossil fuel energy needed to produce one calorie of plant-based protein. Cutting out meat, once a week is an easy, healthy way to curb fossil fuel demand.

    Protect our Oceans – SOFIA 2012 estimates that in 2009, 57 per cent of marine fisheries were fully exploited, while 30 per cent of all assessed marine stocks were over-exploited. Unless we reverse course, there will soon be no more edible fish in our mighty oceans.

    Land Degradation. The Ministry of the Environment reports that animal farming is causing contamination, erosion, and compaction of New Zealand soil. Soil erosion is a natural process that has been accelerated by deforestation and intensive agriculture to rates about 100 times faster than the rates at which nature can form soil. According to UNEP, 24 per cent of the global land area has declined in productivity over the past 25 years due to unsustainable land-use.

    Deforestation – Globally, one third of our planet’s landmass has already been cleared to farm animals, making animal farming the leading cause of deforestation around the world. 51 per cent of land in New Zealand, much of it once pristine native forest, is now farmland. With projected increase in global and domestic demand, the Ministry for Primary Industries has reported that some hundreds of thousands of hectares of forestry land are at risk of being converted to farms.

    FOR WORLD HUNGER
    The less meat you eat – the more people we can feed! Currently around 870 million people, or one in eight, are suffering from chronic malnutrition, yet 80 percent of the world’s agricultural land is used to produce feed for farmed animals. If everyone on earth received 25 percent of his or her calories from animal products, only 3.2 billion people would have food to eat. Dropping that figure to 15 percent would mean that 4.2 billion people could be fed. If the whole world became vegan, there would be plenty food to feed all of us – more than 6.3 billion people.

    In The Food Revolution, John Robbins estimates that more than 20 vegetarians can be fed on the same amount of land needed to feed one person consuming a meat-based diet. This is because animals convert plant protein and energy into meat protein and energy very inefficiently. It takes approximately 10kgs of grain and 13000 to 15000 litres of water, for instance, to produce just 1kg of beef! Furthermore, continued growth in meat output creates competition for grain between affluent meat-eaters and the world’s poor, driving up food prices.

    Meat producers are hoping to double the global production of meat by 2050. But this is not inevitable – or desirable. Taking the Meat Free Monday pledge will reduce your meat consumption by 15 percent, help curb global demand, and free up land and resources to produce other foodstuffs and control future food prices.

    FOR ANIMALS
    The average meat-eater during their lifetime is personally responsible for the slaughter of 5 cows, 20 pigs, 30 sheep, 760 chickens, 46 turkeys, 15 ducks, 7 rabbits, 1 1/2 geese and 1/2 tonne of fish. According to the Worldwatch Institute, some 56 billion animals around the world are raised and slaughtered for food each year. In New Zealand, approximately 130 million are killed annually and millions more are farmed for dairy and eggs. This massive scale of meat production would not possible without the development of commercial methods of farming, or factory farming. These methods often overlook the welfare of animals, depriving them of exercise, space, fresh air and social interaction. Under crowded conditions, animals are kept ‘healthy’ with regular doses of antibiotics – traces of which can remain in the meat we eat, and which have been associated with the rise in antibiotic resistant bacteria in animals and humans.

    By choosing to Meat Free Monday you can save around 15 lives each year and send the message that you refuse to support the use of animals for food production.

    REPLACE MEAT WITH MUSHROOMS TO LOSE WEIGHT
    “They have essentially no calories and zero fat, plus several micronutrients.” – Dr. Lawrence Cheskin of the Hopkins Weight Management Center.

    About Quorn

    WHAT IS QUORN?
    Our range of versatile ingredients, meals and snacks are varied and delicious. Our products are quick to prepare for you and your family, they’re a great source of protein and many are low in fat.

    WHAT IS MYCOPROTEIN?
    Mycoprotein is the common ingredient in all Quorn products. It’s made from a member of the fungi family (the same family that morels and truffles belong to) and is a high-quality meat-free protein that’s low in fat, high in dietary fibre (important for your digestive system) and is a valuable source of amino acids. Our expert chefs really know how to get the best out of mycoprotein, allowing them to create our range of sausages and burgers as well as cooking ingredients like mince, strips and pieces.

    Source of protein
    Quorn products are a high quality vegetarian protein source. They have all the essential amino acids you find in meats like beef and chicken.
    Zero cholesterol
    The following Quorn products contain absolutely no cholesterol: which makes them perfect for a heart friendly diet:
    •Mince
    •Pieces
    •Meat-Style Balls
    •Chicken-Style Burgers
    •Garlic and Herb Fillets
    •Fajita Strips (chilled)
    •Mince (chilled)
    •Pepper & Herb Sausages (chilled)
    •Sweet Chilli Stir Fry Strips (chilled)
    •BBQ Sausages (chilled)

    Quick and tasty
    You can cook Quorn foods in your oven, grill or microwave, as you would do for meat and poultry. Plus there’s no need to defrost Quorn foods – you can cook them straight from frozen.

    Low in fat
    The following products are all low in fat:
    •Mince
    •Meat-Style Balls
    •Mince (chilled)

    Is Quorn a sustainable product?
    One of the main reasons Quorn foods were invented was to be part of the solution to the growing global population’s increasing demand for protein.
    Livestock is a very inefficient source of protein which is why we believe eating Quorn products instead of meat can be a more sustainable option.
    To see the developments in this area from a UK and global perspective, here is a link to the Carbon Footprint Summary 2015 that has been produced by Quorn Foods in the UK.

    Quorn Story
    FAQ’s

    Quorn Vegan
    Vegan Recipes

    Processes

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    My idea is to create some interesting typographical hand-lettering quotes to either be placed onto merchadise or posters.

    TEXT

    Quorn Rhyming words

    Lettering Pinterest
    Font Pinterest

    Global demands for meat

    Hand lettering tips
    WHO nutrition
    What if the world went vegetarian BBC article
    Telegraph truth about Quorn
    World meat free day information
    World meat free day website
    Creating a slogan
    Slogan generator, ‘meat-free’
    Slogan generator, ‘quorn’
    Slogans to help you quit smoking
    Meat puns
    Best food puns

    Food Typography

    More research on:
    -campaign tips and ideas
    -typography ideas
    -flexitarians?
    -meat-occasionals

    TEXT
    TEXT
    TEXT
    TEXT
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    Practitioners

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    Pricklypoppyblue

    Flowering words

    electriceunice

    Jess Park

    Jenna Rainey

    Lindsay Shannon


    Documentation of working process

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    Images


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  • YCN – UK Greetings

    Ideas    |    Choice   |    Processes   |    Practitioners   |    Documentation   |    Evaluation

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    Browsing for ideas

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    YCN Brief choices
    UK Greetings Brief
    Deliverables Guidelines

    UK Greetings
    We create greeting cards, gift dressings and social expressions products for big events, special occasions and those “saw-this-and-thought-of-you” moments of life. We’re the largest direct to retail publisher, so you’ll find our products just about everywhere!

    Creative submissions
    Our studios
    About

    christmas list
    ways to say merry xmas
    TEXT
    TEXT
    TEXT
    TEXT

    To kick start a few of my ideas, I had a look at mass market websites that sell a variety of gifts and cards for different occasions, to see what was popular:

    Moonpig
    Funky Pigeon
    Greetings Cards
    Hallmark
    John Lewis

     
    For further ideas I looked at some specialist websites that inspired me:

    Paperchase
    Ohh Deer
    The Curious Pancake
    The Printed Peanut
    Not on the High Street
    Champaign Paper

     
    During my searches I came across these images that I found inspirational:

     



     

    Choice

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    To begin, I need to explore which occasions I would like to target and why. Below is a list of possible occasions I could experiment with:
     

    Christmas   |    Easter   |    Valentines   |    New Home   |    Congratulations   |    Wedding
    Good Luck   |    Engagement   |    Sympathy   |    Get Well Soon    |    Thank You   |    Anniversary
    Mother’s Day   |   Father’s Day   |   Birthday   |    Baby

     
    The highlighted 6 occasions are links to my pinterest boards relating to each occasion, that I used for inspiration.

     



     

    Processes

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    PROCESSES
    Papercut
    Lasercut
    Foiling
    Lino Printing
    http://www.countryliving.co.uk/create/craft/news/a192/add-a-personal-touch-with-these-handmade-stamps/
    Stamping  
    https://www.seasaltcornwall.co.uk/blog/11/2013/get-crafty-this-christmas-a-unique-wrap/?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=26112013%20gifts%20for%20him%20gifts%20for%20her%20(1)&utm_content=?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=26112013%20gifts%20for%20him%20gifts%20for%20her%20(1)&utm_content=
    printed wrapping paper

    I have gathered a few helpful websites to guide the creation of my final pieces. These are as follows:

    Project Craft
    Card Making Techniques
    Martha Stewart Card Making

    The above links have been useful to see what techniques I could use for my cards. Below are techniques I have considered and / or used:

    Foiling
    I really like the idea of foiling text for my cards, however, purchasing a foiling machine is rather expensive and it can only work in reaction to having a laser printer.

    (Further foiling info).

    Die-cutting (What is die-cutting?)
    Again, I think die-cutting would be an interesting process to use for my cards as I love paper cuts I think this would add to my future skills-sets. However again the technology is quite expensive, but it is a process I would like to keep in mind.

    Photoshop
    Creating a greetings card in photoshop would be an interesting idea, as I’ve got photoshop already it’s something I will use. Especially as it will give my cards a ‘cleaner’ and more professional appearance (hopefully). I would also like to go over my hand-drawn elements in illustrator to enhance colours and straighten and smooth out any lines.

    Make pop-up cards

    Some more tips, advice and ideas:

    Font possibilities:

    Script
    Watermelon Script
    Master of Break
    Stylish Calligraphy
    Salsabilla*
    Sophia
    Buttercup*

    Brush
    Emily the Brush
    Bocadillo
    Cinnabar Brush
    Love Moment*
    Sensory Overload*
    Bromello*
    Alit Suarnegara

    Printing Techniques:
    Printing Greetings Cards
    Comes complete with artwork tips, templates, paper choices,finishing techniques and more!
    Types of Paper & Card

     



     

    Practitioners

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    http://amyheitman.com/

    http://nicholasjohnfrith.com/

    http://timholtz.com/

    Elod Beregszaszi


    Beregszaszi’s beautifully designed cards are inspirational to me, I would love to create my own range of pop-up cards that work as effectively as these. I love Beregszaszi’s simple and clean cut designs, that manipulate light and colour in a vibrant and unique way.
     
    Sophie Corrigan

    Corrigan’s amusing and adorable illustrations work perfectly for her wonderfully humorous designs. They are superbly clever and have that simple, hand drawn feel, that is coveted in a lot of contemporary illustration. I’d like to make my designs as just as simple and hopefully just as effective as Corrigan’s.
     
    Lucie Chadderton

    Chadderton’s card designs also have a magnificent handmade feel with her brilliant brush strokes for text and illustrations. I especially love the font used on her cards as they tend to be the main focus. This has inspired my thought choice for the type and font that I will use on my final designs. It has also shown me how effective the colour choice and backgrounds can highlight the overlaying text.
     
    Gemma Correll

    Correll’s designs have a simple but ‘clean’ feel to them. The lines are carefully drawn, and a lot of thought and humour has gone into each fantastic piece. I also like the basic colour palette – using black and white mostly with only one or two other colours, I feel this compliments Correll’s style beautifully.
     
    Faye Finney

    Finney’s designs also have a humorous aspect, using play on words to describe celebrities in an amusing light. I love her illustrations as they depict these celebs in very identifiable ways, yet the incorporate her play one words subsequently too. I really like the simple use of shading that has been used on her characters too as this makes each image stand out better.
     
    Sarah Andreacchio

    Andreacchio’s illustrations are wonderfully vibrant and colourful. I really love the creatures and patterns that she uses, in her designs as I feel these are portrayed in a highly effective way. I especially like how the text on her designs isn’t the main feature, as it makes the overall design more intriguing. Despite this, I think I’d like to make my fonts more prominent on my final pieces, as I feel that type is a strength of mine.

     



     

    Documentation of working process

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