Stagecoach

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Stagecoach East Midlands partner with Hull School of Art and Design to launch Hull Bus Strokes
14 Mar 2017

In celebration of Hull 2017 UK City of Culture, Stagecoach East Midlands has teamed up with the Hull School of Art and Design to transform a double-decker bus into an artistic masterpiece named Hull Bus Strokes.

The students have been asked to produce a design for the bus exterior. The project will form part of their coursework and the winning design, as voted for by Stagecoach and a guest judge, will be painted and displayed on the Hull art bus. The winners will be chosen in April.

The winning composition will be painted onto a double-decker bus, in a street art style, and visitors and residents of Hull will have the opportunity to watch the bus transformed into a visual masterpiece.

Once completed, the bus will be publically unveiled and run on major routes, throughout Hull, for the remainder of the City of Culture year. The bus will create a spectacular moving artist piece, along the streets and roads of Hull, and act as a brilliant showcase for the Hull School of Art and Design.

The project is a fitting tribute to Hull and its students, as the city celebrates being the 2017 UK City of Culture. Michelle Hargreaves, Managing Director of Stagecoach East Midlands, said:

“We are delighted to announce details of our exciting art project with Hull School of Art and Design. The double-decker bus will showcase a truly unique piece of art and, by inviting local people to view the transformation; we are involving the whole community. We hope that people get great enjoyment from seeing this very special bus and traveling aboard it, as it travels along major routes throughout the city in 2017.”

Students from across a range of courses are being invited to put forward their proposals for the project.

Chris Dimmack, of Hull School of Art and Design, said: “We are very excited to work with Stagecoach. This project offers our degree students a valuable opportunity to work with one of the largest bus operators in the UK. The students are looking forward to participating and contributing personally to the UK City of Culture celebrations.

“The final artwork applied to the bus will add an exciting twist to the fabric of the city celebrating the people and rich history of Hull as it tours Bransholme, Greatfield and Orchard Park during the next 12 months. We hope the special 2017 Stagecoach Culture Bus will create a feeling of pride for everyone in the City of Hull.”

The project comes after Stagecoach has invested £2.7million in a fleet of 15 new double decker buses for Hull. The state-of-the-art vehicles are running on the popular Simplibus network joining main residential areas of Hull with Paragon Interchange through the heart of the city centre, which is currently being transformed by major public realm works.

To find out more about what we are up to this year, go to our Hull UK City of Culture 2017 page!

https://www.stagecoachbus.com/news/east-midlands/2017/march/stagecoach-east-midlands-partner-with-hull-school-of-art-and-design-to-launch-hull-bus-strokes

https://www.stagecoachbus.com/promos-and-offers/east-midlands/hull-uk-city-of-culture-2017

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Go Card or Go Home!

https://ohhdeer.com/competition/brief brief
https://ohhdeer.com/competition?p=5 submissions
https://ohhdeer.com/customer/account/login/ submit work
https://ohhdeer.com/competition/terms-and-conditions terms and conditions

GUIDELINES:

IMAGE TYPE: JPEG

PORTRAIT: 529X750PX

LANDSCAPE: 750X529PX

SQUARE: 529X529PX

Ideeas
Choice
Process
Artists

LIM HENG SWEE
https://ohhdeer.com/collections/lim-heng-swee

JORDAN CARTER
https://ohhdeer.com/collections/jordan-carter

Catalogue & Logo Design

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Exhibition Catalogues

Desk-top publishing of exhibition catalogues by Arabella Decker

Reason for creating catalogues: I have discovered that a catalogue is the proof that a show has taken place. Without printed and available documentation, people forget who and what was shown after the exhibit is over. In case of disaster (like fire or flood), the catalogue may be the only proof an official will accept about the artist’s level of professional achievement (think insurance). The fact that catalogues are held in many hands assures the survivability of the information.

Making a catalogue by hand: You will need: 1. Shiny or textured card stock @ $20. or more a ream (500 sheets). 2. Paper for printing the catalog is expensive because it should be heavy paper that does not bleed and does take ink well. Count your pages, then decide whether you will print on one side or two (two-sided requires heavier paper but half as many sheets). Multiply by the number of catalogues to be produced in order to determine your materials cost. 3. Photoshop and /or another program that can be used to create each and every page will cost $700. – $1500. 4. Ink is a surprise cost because you need a lot of color and/or black ink to make the images and print stand out on each page (at least $100. or more, depending on the number of catalogues to be printed). 5. Epson printers with archival inks are the best for the job @ $300. 6. Either a special punch and coil system or a special staple system will be needed to put the book together. Punch and Coil will run $300. A staple system for less than 50 pages will cost $20.

Intense work and editing is needed: 1. First all images must be taken (300 dpi recommended) 2. Statements must be written and edited 3. Pages designed 4. Pages printed 5. Pages collated
6. Pages and cover put together and bound

Pitfalls of an in-house created catalog: 1. Because it does not have an ISBN number, it has less archival value for researchers. 2. Artists often write pages of nonsense (“artspeak”) unrelated to the work shown. 3. Grammar, spelling, and sentence structure must be checked by an experienced editor. 4. People often want more catalogs than were ordered and printed.

A lot of work, but it is worth the effort to document your art and your exhibitions!

TIPS

About Artist’s Statements: Take the time, make the effort, to write an effective artist’s statement. The artist statement cannot be understated or underestimated. A clear, concise, well-written artist statement is essential. It can move the artist’s work from being just another pretty piece to a more scholarly level.

Other notes on catalogues: As a curator and having produced many catalogues, I would like to stress the importance of:
• good quality images of one’s artwork;
• making sure the information given for the work is accurate.

How to write an Artist’s Statement
8 Examples of Artist statements
How to write a statement that doesn’t suck
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Batsford Prize for Illustration 2017 (Nature)

Ideas    |    Choice   |    Processes   |    Practitioners   |    Documentation   |    Evaluation

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Batsford Prize
How to enter
2016 winners



 

Choice

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 NATURE

Nature & Us
Humans Nature Right Relationship[
BBC
Marxist Perspective
Environment
Icebreaker
National Geographic
2/3’s of the world animals will be lost by 2020

It’s not pollution that’s the problem.
It’s not waste that’s the problem.
It’s not climate change that’s the problem.
It’s not global warming that’s the problem.
It’s not polar ice caps melting that’s the problem.
It’s not deforestation that’s the problem.
These are symptoms of a bigger issue.
It’s the way we think, the way we live today.
If your sick, you go to a doctor. If there’s a problem you find a solution.
We only have one planet.
We all live on the same one.
We all have a common interest. This is our home and we are burning it down.
 



 

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Lino
Foil
Lasercut / Papercut
Watercolour & Outlines

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Svabhu Kohli

Eloise Renouf

Alfred Basha

Clare Curtis

Eiko Ojala

Marcel George

 



 

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YCN – Quorn

Ideas | Choice | Processes | Practitioners | Documentation | Evaluation

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Brief choices

Quorn brief

Deliverables Guidelines

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Quorn
A GREAT TASTING RANGE
Quorn is perfect if you’re trying to eat healthier as part of an active lifestyle, watching your weight, or if you want some meat-free meal inspiration.

Plus products like Quorn Mince are a great source of protein that still allow you to enjoy all your favourite meals.

WHAT ARE
QUORN PRODUCTS?
Quorn products are made from Mycoprotein™. Mycoprotein™ is a nutritionally healthy protein source that is meat free and naturally low in saturated fat and high in fibre.

Quorn products have the taste, appearance and texture of meat, perfect if you want meat free meals or are thinking of creating healthier versions of your favourite everyday meals.

HOW IS
QUORN MADE?
Quorn’s main ingredient is
Mycoprotein
™, a nutritionally healthy protein source.
Mycoprotein
™ is produced by a process of fermentation similar to that used for yeast in bread. Unlike other meat alternatives, there’s no strong aftertaste, and Quorn is great at absorbing the flavours used in cooking, making for great tasting meals.

Can I be intolerant to Quorn?
View our intolerance information page.

Quorn sustainability

BETTER FOR YOU
& THE PLANET
Quorn products are made from Mycoprotein™. Mycoprotein™ is a nutritionally Healthy Protein that is Meat Free and naturally low in saturated fat and high in protein and fibre. Quorn products have the taste appearance and texture of meat, perfect for if you’re thinking about eating less meat or creating healthier versions of your favourite everyday meals.

Recommended by
doctors,
nutritionists
and heart
foundations
all over
the world

A NOTE FROM
OUR CEO
At Quorn we have a simple mission, ‘to help consumers eat less meat’. Given the ethical, health and environmental benefits of Quorn foods, this places corporate responsibility at the heart of everything we do.

Kevin

From farm to fork
we’re dedicated to
outstanding
environmental
performance

Quorn is the first global meat-alternative brand to achieve third party certification of it’s carbon footprint figures. See Carbon Trust for more information.
The Carbon Trust’s mission is to accelerate the move to a sustainable, low carbon economy. We are independent experts on carbon reduction and resource efficiency, who reinvest surpluses from group commercial activities into our mission.

Healthy Meal Ideas
Comfort Food Classics
Recipe Range

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D&AD refine brief
create a campaign

Meat Free
Save environment be veggie
Why be veggie?

Persuade others to go vegan

10 reasons to convince people to go meat free today
5 reasons to go meat-free now

  • packed with antioxidants, healthy fats and way more vitamins and minerals
  • slimming
  • not as expensive as buying meat
  • increases longevity
  • Scorching summer temps in June and months-long droughts out west prove that global warming is real. Give the Earth a hug by going meat-free today. It takes 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water to create a single pound of beef, versus 39 gallons of water to produce a pound of vegetables
  • can reduce the risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and more

    You will be bettering your health, have a more optimistic credit card statement and help the planet

  • Transition smoothly, from four legs to two legs to no legs.

    BEST WEBSITE – why go meat free?
    WHY GO MEAT FREE FOR A DAY?

    Welcome to Meat Free Monday New Zealand! Cutting out meat, once a week has taken the world by storm and now Aotearoa is on board with a mission to excite and inspire ALL Kiwis – meat lovers, pie munchers and tree huggers alike – to discover the magnificent world of vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts and seeds.

    We Kiwis love our meat, and in moderation it’s a great source of protein and nutrients. The downside is that our appetite for meat and dairy – millions of pounds a year from millions of animals – takes a toll on our digestive and cardiovascular health, our land, oceans and climate, animal welfare and our wallets!

    With so many tasty Meat Free options, eating clean and green has never been more delicious. Whether you take the Meat Free Monday pledge for the environment, for your wallet, or for your health, you have the power to change the world, simply by changing what’s on your plate.

    So take the plunge, take the pledge: for your health, for your wallet, and for our planet!

    FOR YOUR HEALTH
    And what about your health? The average New Zealander on a Western diet typically consumes double the protein our bodies actually need. Meat in moderation is a great source of protein, iron, zinc, niacin and key vitamins, but the scientific evidence is increasingly clear that over indulging in meat – partucularly red and processed meat – increases our risk of chronic preventable conditions which have reached epic proportions, like heart disease, stroke, cancer, liver and kidney disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Vegetarian meals are naturally low in saturated fat, high in fibre, and full of vitamins, minerals, and cancer-fighting compounds. Meat, dairy products and eggs, on the other hand, are low in fibre and high in saturated fat and cholesterol, which can make us overweight and lead to clogged arteries and heart attacks. Here’s what we have to look forward by reducing our nation’s meat intake:

    Reduce Heart Disease – Beans, peas, nuts and seeds contain little to no saturated fats. Reducing saturated fats can help keep your cholesterol low, and cut risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent data from a Harvard University study found that replacing saturated fat-rich foods (for example, meat and full fat dairy) with foods that are rich in polyunsaturated fat (for example, vegetable oils, nuts and seeds) reduces the risk of heart disease by 19%.

    Limit Cancer Risk – In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund report recommended limiting the consumption of red meats such as beef, pork and lamb because of a ‘convincing’ link with colorectal cancer. We Kiwis top the charts as having the highest rate of this preventable cancer in the world. Hundreds of other studies suggest that diets high in fruits and vegetables can reduce cancer risk.

    Fight Diabetes – Research suggests that plant-based diets – particularly those low in processed meat – can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Eat cleaner – chickens, cows, and pigs aren’t always fed what they’re designed to eat. In many cases they are fed what’s cheap and what makes them grow incredibly fast, including grains, hormones and rendered animals.

    Curb Obesity – People on low-meat or vegetarian diets have significantly lower body weights and body mass indices. A plant-based diet is a great source of fibre (absent in animal products). This makes you feel full with fewer calories, i.e. lower calorie intake and less overeating.

    Live Longer – Red and processed meat consumption is associated with increases in total mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality.

    Improve Your Diet – Consuming protein rich vegetables like peas, beans and lentils results in higher intakes of fibre, protein, folate, zinc, iron and magnesium with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat.

    Just what the doctor ordered!

    FOR YOUR WALLET
    You might be surprised to learn that vegetarian food is not only good for your health and the environment; it’s also easy on your wallet! Food prices are continuing to rise, especially in packaged items and meat, which require extra expenses like feed and transportation. Forgoing meat once a week is a great way to cut the weekly budget. In fact, many staple vegetarian foods cost very little and can be found in the grocery store – not just in specialty markets. Whole grains like quinoa, barley and brown rice, legumes like chickpeas and soybeans, and other beans like black-eyed peas and black beans are protein packed and very inexpensive – certainly cheaper than processed and packaged foods! Bought in bulk, whole grains and beans can cost just pennies per meal. And because they are full of fibre they make you feel full and satisfied (put them into soups, stews, salads, burritos, etc.) without the side effect of heaps of saturated fat from animal protein. One block of tofu will provide a hearty meal for two, at half the price of two cuts of meat. Fresh and seasonal vegetables and fruits can be found at supermarkets and farmers’ markets for very reasonable prices.

    But that’s not all. Giving meat a rest once a week will also help to curb both your personal and our national healthcare expenses in the long run. If you think these don’t affect you so much, think again. At the individual level, being sick is expensive. Moreover, a huge part of our country’s annual budget is committed to health-care costs, paid for by your tax dollars. There are also indirect healthcare costs due to lost productivity.

    Here are some smart shopping tips to help you save on your food bills:

    Buy in season. Produce in season is usually less expensive than out-of-season produce because it’s more abundant.
    Where possible avoid pre-cut, washed, and packaged fruits and vegetables. They’re more expensive (and use more packaging) than whole foods
    Farmers’ markets are a great place to find fresh, in-season, and locally grown produce for cheap — especially if you shop at the end of the market day, when growers may be willing to sell their produce at a discount!
    Frozen veggies, particularly the store brands, are a steal! They are often cheaper than fresh ones, and can actually be more nutritious because the veggies are frozen right after they’re picked, preserving their nutrients. Keep an eye out for sales and stock up your freezer with veggies that can be tossed into soups, stews, stir-fries, pasta, and many other dishes.
    Grow your own! Turn your backyard, patio or kitchen windowsill into valuable real estate and enjoy home grown fruits and vegetables all year long. You’ll get fresh, organic food for a fraction of the price. Seedlings are fantastic, but growing from the seed is mega cheap!

    FOR OUR PLANET
    Cutting out meat, once a week is not only healthy for your body and your bank account; it’s great for the planet too! The livestock industry is one of the largest contributors to global environmental degradation. Producing all that meat and dairy requires large amounts of pesticides, chemical fertiliser, feed, fuel and water. It also generates 50% of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions and deposits a huge amount of toxic manure and wastewater into our groundwater, rivers, streams and, ultimately, the ocean. By taking the Meat Free Monday pledge you’re becoming an environmental champion, reducing your ecological footprint and lightening the load you place on nature.

    Reduce your carbon footprint – Livestock animals produce large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, greenhouse gases far more concentrated than CO2. In 2006, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) concluded that worldwide livestock farming generates 18percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions — compared with 13percent generated by all transportation combined. In 2009, however, WorldWatch Institute reported that the more accurate figure may be as high as 51percent. In New Zealand agriculture is responsible for 50percent of our climate change emissions profile. Annual worldwide demand for meat continues to grow. Cutting out meat, once a week can help slow this trend.

    Protect our fresh water supplies – The water needs of livestock are huge. An estimated 7000 to 9500 litres of water goes into producing only 500 grams of beef! It takes only a fraction of the water used for meat production to make an equivalent amount of plant protein. In addition, the excrement of millions of animals is leaching into our streams, contaminating our water systems and asphyxiating aquatic life and vegetation. Furthermore, pesticides, antibiotics and hormones find their way into our drinking water.

    Reduce fossil fuel dependence. On average, about 40 calories of fossil fuel energy go into every calorie of feed lot beef in the U.S. Compare this to the 2.2 calories of fossil fuel energy needed to produce one calorie of plant-based protein. Cutting out meat, once a week is an easy, healthy way to curb fossil fuel demand.

    Protect our Oceans – SOFIA 2012 estimates that in 2009, 57 per cent of marine fisheries were fully exploited, while 30 per cent of all assessed marine stocks were over-exploited. Unless we reverse course, there will soon be no more edible fish in our mighty oceans.

    Land Degradation. The Ministry of the Environment reports that animal farming is causing contamination, erosion, and compaction of New Zealand soil. Soil erosion is a natural process that has been accelerated by deforestation and intensive agriculture to rates about 100 times faster than the rates at which nature can form soil. According to UNEP, 24 per cent of the global land area has declined in productivity over the past 25 years due to unsustainable land-use.

    Deforestation – Globally, one third of our planet’s landmass has already been cleared to farm animals, making animal farming the leading cause of deforestation around the world. 51 per cent of land in New Zealand, much of it once pristine native forest, is now farmland. With projected increase in global and domestic demand, the Ministry for Primary Industries has reported that some hundreds of thousands of hectares of forestry land are at risk of being converted to farms.

    FOR WORLD HUNGER
    The less meat you eat – the more people we can feed! Currently around 870 million people, or one in eight, are suffering from chronic malnutrition, yet 80 percent of the world’s agricultural land is used to produce feed for farmed animals. If everyone on earth received 25 percent of his or her calories from animal products, only 3.2 billion people would have food to eat. Dropping that figure to 15 percent would mean that 4.2 billion people could be fed. If the whole world became vegan, there would be plenty food to feed all of us – more than 6.3 billion people.

    In The Food Revolution, John Robbins estimates that more than 20 vegetarians can be fed on the same amount of land needed to feed one person consuming a meat-based diet. This is because animals convert plant protein and energy into meat protein and energy very inefficiently. It takes approximately 10kgs of grain and 13000 to 15000 litres of water, for instance, to produce just 1kg of beef! Furthermore, continued growth in meat output creates competition for grain between affluent meat-eaters and the world’s poor, driving up food prices.

    Meat producers are hoping to double the global production of meat by 2050. But this is not inevitable – or desirable. Taking the Meat Free Monday pledge will reduce your meat consumption by 15 percent, help curb global demand, and free up land and resources to produce other foodstuffs and control future food prices.

    FOR ANIMALS
    The average meat-eater during their lifetime is personally responsible for the slaughter of 5 cows, 20 pigs, 30 sheep, 760 chickens, 46 turkeys, 15 ducks, 7 rabbits, 1 1/2 geese and 1/2 tonne of fish. According to the Worldwatch Institute, some 56 billion animals around the world are raised and slaughtered for food each year. In New Zealand, approximately 130 million are killed annually and millions more are farmed for dairy and eggs. This massive scale of meat production would not possible without the development of commercial methods of farming, or factory farming. These methods often overlook the welfare of animals, depriving them of exercise, space, fresh air and social interaction. Under crowded conditions, animals are kept ‘healthy’ with regular doses of antibiotics – traces of which can remain in the meat we eat, and which have been associated with the rise in antibiotic resistant bacteria in animals and humans.

    By choosing to Meat Free Monday you can save around 15 lives each year and send the message that you refuse to support the use of animals for food production.

    REPLACE MEAT WITH MUSHROOMS TO LOSE WEIGHT
    “They have essentially no calories and zero fat, plus several micronutrients.” – Dr. Lawrence Cheskin of the Hopkins Weight Management Center.

    About Quorn

    WHAT IS QUORN?
    Our range of versatile ingredients, meals and snacks are varied and delicious. Our products are quick to prepare for you and your family, they’re a great source of protein and many are low in fat.

    WHAT IS MYCOPROTEIN?
    Mycoprotein is the common ingredient in all Quorn products. It’s made from a member of the fungi family (the same family that morels and truffles belong to) and is a high-quality meat-free protein that’s low in fat, high in dietary fibre (important for your digestive system) and is a valuable source of amino acids. Our expert chefs really know how to get the best out of mycoprotein, allowing them to create our range of sausages and burgers as well as cooking ingredients like mince, strips and pieces.

    Source of protein
    Quorn products are a high quality vegetarian protein source. They have all the essential amino acids you find in meats like beef and chicken.
    Zero cholesterol
    The following Quorn products contain absolutely no cholesterol: which makes them perfect for a heart friendly diet:
    •Mince
    •Pieces
    •Meat-Style Balls
    •Chicken-Style Burgers
    •Garlic and Herb Fillets
    •Fajita Strips (chilled)
    •Mince (chilled)
    •Pepper & Herb Sausages (chilled)
    •Sweet Chilli Stir Fry Strips (chilled)
    •BBQ Sausages (chilled)

    Quick and tasty
    You can cook Quorn foods in your oven, grill or microwave, as you would do for meat and poultry. Plus there’s no need to defrost Quorn foods – you can cook them straight from frozen.

    Low in fat
    The following products are all low in fat:
    •Mince
    •Meat-Style Balls
    •Mince (chilled)

    Is Quorn a sustainable product?
    One of the main reasons Quorn foods were invented was to be part of the solution to the growing global population’s increasing demand for protein.
    Livestock is a very inefficient source of protein which is why we believe eating Quorn products instead of meat can be a more sustainable option.
    To see the developments in this area from a UK and global perspective, here is a link to the Carbon Footprint Summary 2015 that has been produced by Quorn Foods in the UK.

    Quorn Story
    FAQ’s

    Quorn Vegan
    Vegan Recipes

    Processes

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    My idea is to create some interesting typographical hand-lettering quotes to either be placed onto merchadise or posters.

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    Quorn Rhyming words

    Lettering Pinterest
    Font Pinterest

    Global demands for meat

    Hand lettering tips
    WHO nutrition
    What if the world went vegetarian BBC article
    Telegraph truth about Quorn
    World meat free day information
    World meat free day website
    Creating a slogan
    Slogan generator, ‘meat-free’
    Slogan generator, ‘quorn’
    Slogans to help you quit smoking
    Meat puns
    Best food puns

    Food Typography

    More research on:
    -campaign tips and ideas
    -typography ideas
    -flexitarians?
    -meat-occasionals

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    Practitioners

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    Pricklypoppyblue

    Flowering words

    electriceunice

    Jess Park

    Jenna Rainey

    Lindsay Shannon


    Documentation of working process

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    Images


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